Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Customer Relationship Management Schemes

Question: Discuss about customer relationship management schemes, multi-channel approach and consumers purchasing behaviour? Answer: Tesco was founded by Sir Jack Cohen in 1919. It is considered as the third most popular and largest retail chain stores in the world, Wal-Mart being at number one. Customer relationship management schemes With a ground-breaking Club-card based loyalty scheme and the improvement of a tactical CRM (Customer Relationship Management) plan, the company extended the foundation for true customer understanding and better brand commitment. In the year 1995, the Tesco club card scheme was announced to provide a better service to the consumers (Hallberg, 2004). The club card helped in providing necessary information regarding appraising, customer services, advertisings, customer purchase, media usefulness, customer transportation and shop exploration. During 1993-1994, The First Class service was launched followed by One on Front service to minimize the long waiting hours at the time of check-out (Jones, 2001). Again, in the year 2000, www.tesco.com was born that focussed on the business of e-commerce and the Customer Championship and the Learn Thinking concepts were introduced the following year. In order to increase their availability to customers, the company even expanded the fixation of pho ne lines. Also My Time, exclusively for women, was developed giving out information related to beauty salon, discounted cosmetics, luxury spa, perfumes, multi-specialty gym and designer wears. The sole mission of Tesco was to expand the value for customers and earn their life-time loyalty. The company is credited to have one of the best customer relationship management in the business having an insight into the knowledge of a customers thoughts and emotions about grocery shopping. Tesco also issues company magazines to give its products information to its loyal customers. As a part of customer relationship management initiative, Tesco launched a loyalty card scheme which was based on Tesco club card. It promised the customers that they can earn one loyalty point for every 1 they spend in buying the companys products in Tesco store or online at Tesco.com. These points can be easily redeemed when buying Tesco products in store or in places like inns, galleries, park reserve, tourist attractions, and eateries (Turner, Wilson, 2006).. The club card scheme was far more than just a consumer reward scheme and its main aim was to generate data related to the habits and purchasing patterns of customers. This information helped the company to take decisions regarding the development of its new products, its pricing strategy, and management of the product range, marketing tools, and the customer procurement. The biggest reason for the success of the club card was that the customer felt valued and recognised owing to its mailing facilities. There is no doubt that the club card proved to be triumph card for Tesco, being a major contributor in the business profit. However, despite its facilities it failed to keep up pace with the rapidly changing market environment. Currently the customer buying behaviour and the business environment has drastically changed from the time the club card was launched (Worksmart.org.uk, n.d.). Nowadays, more number of products is being sold on promotion in the global market and the mailing facility provided by the club card is no longer exclusivity as competitive coupon activity dominates the business. In such competitive market, loyalty schemes would be a costly way of sales promotions. Moreover, customers of today are more challenging as they are more conscious of the brand and tend to fall for the stores discount offers. The technologic environment of the market has also advanced with the rise of e-receipts. It is much easier now to generate a more comprehensive data regarding the customer buying behaviour than it used to be as the club card could only generate the data from one source. The management team of Tesco is facing the challenge of managing customer relationship. In such a competitive market that is full of discounters. Basically, there needs to be balance between the United Kingdom procedure and Tescos growth overseas. Multi-channel approach Tesco provides the multi-channel approach, the facility of both store channel and website/internet channel to its customers (Collins, Burt, 1999). The consumers who buy groceries online tend to spend twice as money as they spend in the companies stores. Tesco is said to have invested a huge amount in order to develop and expand its multi-channel plans beyond the UK market place. The recurrent schedule of grocery shopping for everyday merchandises creates important characteristic buying patterns that might be hard to amend. These behaviours comprise the aptitude to taste and scan foodstuffs and the chance to see associated stuffs that were not formerly on the supermarket run list. Online shopping might be seemed as a way to get freedom from an inauspicious chore. Therefore, dissimilar buyer groups show fluctuating attraction to online grocery shopping and divergent inclination to pay an exceptional fee for home delivery. Merchandizing chains entails a large number of stores which are closely linked with their headquarters, especially in case of authorizing (Sparks, 1986). If the net is used to develop a new delivery network that bypasses stores, fights are probable to happen. Owing to the low revenue in online deals, the companies as well as its managing operation are careful not to needlessly separate or upset their delivery associates. There are a few advantages and disadvantages of both the channels. Advantages of store channels include surfing, touching sensation, Reserved Facility, Cash and credit payment. The disadvantages of store-channels are that the growing of trades in stores is deteriorating and it requires a great deal of obligation for employing and training. Also, there is a difficulty in bestowing retail successfully in-store. In the UK market, Tesco introduced a home shopping service with the launch of Tesco.com website and on May 1984, in England, Mrs Snowball became the first online shopper (Humby, Hunt, 2004). Tesco expanded its internet services beyond UK and in the year 1993, it became the first retail company in the world to offer home shopping service. Again, advantages of internet channel includes the option of wide spread, Lesser Charge, Convenience, Wider Choice and 24*7 accessible. The disadvantages of internet channel are Absence of one-to-one communication, Lack of post-purchase provision, refunding disputes, not trace, sense and smell goods, Terror of scam, ID stealing and safety External factors that affected the Tesco Retail Company on the recent years Pest Factor Political Factors Tesco has its stores across the global and hence it is influenced to a great extent by the political environment of different countries. Different countries in United Kingdom, have been observed, focussing on their domestic companies interest more than the foreign firms interest. They make varied laws of duty and verifying policies for the domestic and non-domestic retail corporations. Again political unrest in some countries has an adverse effect on Tescos business. Economic factors: Economic factors affect the company in a big way. Growth in the economy of a country creates a demand and downfall in a countrys economy declines the demand. Economic inflation affects buyers purchasing power (Smith, Sparks, 2004). Rise and fall in the exchange rate also affects the shares of the firms functioning in the global market. Social/Cultural Factors The customers, at present prefer going for one-stop or bulk shopping owing to the socio-cultural changes. Hence, Tesco has expanded its food and non-food items on sale. Moreover, customers now, have become more health conscious and demand products that are healthy and non-toxic. Tesco has taken initiatives to increase its organic products to meet the increasing demand of the consumers (Winterman, 2013). Technological Factors Technology is one of the major factor that has affected Tesco and the companys products in a big way. The advanced technologies has helped both the company and the customers as it has made shopping easier and more convenient for the customers and the manufacturing procedure effective for the company. The introduction of the Efficient Consumer Response (ECR), Electronic Funds Transfer Systems (EFTPoS) and electronic scanners have helped in the growth of the business. Supplier Issues Suppliers can take the decision of raising the price of orders which could affect a companys profit share. Again, a suppliers consistency can affect the business because if raw materials arrive late, even the finished goods would be late in shipping to consumers. The credit terms, too, can be altered as per the suppliers wish and they could decide whether a discount should be offered on the bulk order (Finch, 2004). Tesco has been the highest shareholder in the UK grocery market for more than twenty five years. It has around three thousands stores in UK alone and comprises of twenty eight to thirty percent of market share. However, owing to its scandals and tough competition from its rivals, the market share and demand of Tesco food products have declined. The below chart shows the market share status of Tesco. This year the scandal of Tescos accounting crisis is astonishing as there is shortfall of 250m in the companys account which is equivalent to a quarter its predicted profit share (Palmer, 2005). It is deduced from this scandal that Supermarkets do not make instant payment to the suppliers. In fact, Tesco and its suppliers function mainly through credit accounts and its suppliers claim that Tesco is the most aggressive retail company to work with. Nonetheless, by regulating the relationship between the retailers and suppliers, the company can save itself from such scandals. Again, in the year 2013, there has been a report of horsemeat in meat burgers scandal. Tesco confirmed that its findings have agreed with that of Irish government officials (Lindgreen, Hingley, 2003). Hence, as a precautionary measure, the company fired one of its main suppliers, Silvercrest of ABP food groups so that the incident does not happen again. Tesco even started its own system of wide-ranging DNA testing. This year, Tesco has faced yet another scandal known as bullying of suppliers scandal. The company is accused of mistreating the suppliers, delaying their payments and braeching of Groceries Supply Code of Practice. Tescos account and profits are under investigation undertaken by the Groceries Code Adjudicator (GCA). To make sure justice is given to the suppliers. Consumers Purchasing Behaviour Psychological: Attitude- attitude is directly and indirectly associated with the marketing strategy of a company. The success or failure of the companys promotion plans affects the customers attitude towards the companys products. Attitudes of a customer are highly influenced by the family member or the closed ones (Rowley, 2005). No wonder, it is seen, that a lot of companies start a promotion or introductory offer on its products to influence the customers attitudes (Clark, 2014). Learning- By learning, a customer becomes more aware than before and goes through changes that affect their buying behaviour. Information and experience helps them in deciding what to buy and where to buy it from? With every experience, the customer learns which gets modified into attitudes. For instance if a customer comes across a sale offer, he or she advises other reference groups to purchase the discounted product on sale. That is the reason, that new information and free samples should be given out to customers Personal Lifestyle of an individual plays a vital role in affecting his or her buying behaviour. At present, there is a preference and demand for healthy/organic foods. Age and life-cycle-Age and life-cycle of a customer, again, an indicator of a customers buying behaviour. For instance older customer would buy things that would meet their physical and mental requirement. Children, on the other hand, buy products that attract them irrespective of its effect on his or her health (Dawson, 2006). Culture Since culture is the most important part of a consumers needs and actions, it is an important factor that affects consumer buying behaviour. Essentially culture is known to influence our lives through society, educational and family unit. An individual living in a society has to abide by its laws and regulations. Social factors: Reference Group: Consumer behaviour is prejudiced by certain reference groups. Reference group consisting of class friends, family members, and friends, affect the buying pattern of a consumer the most as most of the day-to-day interactions are with them. Family Group: Family members of the buyer have strong effect on customer's activities. Children who stay in a joint family or with parents, give the family group the opportunity to influence their minds and take important decisions for them. Recommendations: New Product Development In Switzerland, there is a high demand of food brand establishments. By concentrating on the Swiss market, Tesco could create a market of its own and develop new products as per the Swiss peoples preferences. Market development The development of market strategy would help Tesco to expand its company and it can start establishing itself in Switzerland for food and non-food retail businesses. After procuring the permission to get started there, the company can come up with new and innovative products targeting all age group. With efficient marketing strategy and efficient manufacturing planning could help Tesco grow. Segmentation Strategy Segmentation strategy should be initiated by Tesco for its successful functioning in Swiss lands (Dawson, 2006). Initially the company should start with the launch of small stores and aim to produce quality goods at a fair price to people as they are super conscious about the products quality. Targeting Strategy Tesco should aim to target all age groups of consumers. This targeting strategy will help the company recognise the business prospective. The company can offer a wide range of its products in a structured arrangement which would in turn help its revenue share. Positioning strategy In order to develop a marketing strategy, market positioning strategy is very important (Yoruk, Radosevic, 2000). Positioning strategy adoption will help Tesco determine their status as accompany, and their standing in comparison to its rivals. Again, by positioning strategy, the company can keep a check on its products and similar products produced by other companies. Somerfield Other s Sainsbury Tesco Morrisons Asda Waitrose References Rowley, J. (2005). Building brand webs: Customer relationship management through the Tesco Clubcard loyalty scheme. International Journal of Retail Distribution Management, 33(3), 194-206. Dawson, J. (2006). Retail trends in Europe. In Retailing in the 21st Century (pp. 41-58). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Palmer, M. (2005). Retail multinational learning: a case study of Tesco. International journal of retail distribution management, 33(1), 23-48. Clark, T. (2014). A history of Tesco: The rise of Britain's biggest supermarket. [online] Available at: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/markets/2788089/A-history-of-Tesco-The-rise-of-Britains-biggest-supermarket.html [Accessed 12 Apr. 2015]. Winterman, D. (2013). Tesco: How one supermarket came to dominate. [online] BBC News. Available at: https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-23988795 [Accessed 12 Apr. 2015]. Smith, D., Sparks, L. (2004). Logistics in Tesco: past, present and future. Logistics and Retail Management, 2, 101-120. Humby, C., Hunt, T. (2004). Scoring points: How Tesco is winning customer loyalty. Kogan Page Publishers. Sparks, L. (1986). The changing structure of distribution in retail companies: an example from the grocery trade. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 147-154. Collins, A., Burt, S. (1999). Dependency in manufacturer-retailer relationships: the potential implications of retail internationalisation for indigenous food manufacturers. Journal of Marketing Management, 15(7), 673-693. Finch, P. (2004). Supply chain risk management. Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, 9(2), 183-196. Lindgreen, A., Hingley, M. (2003). The impact of food safety and animal welfare policies on supply chain management: the case of the Tesco meat supply chain. British Food Journal, 105(6), 328-349. Worksmart.org.uk, (n.d.). Your company: TESCO STORES LIMITED: company details - from workSMART.org.uk. [online] Available at: https://www.worksmart.org.uk/company/company.php?id=00519500 [Accessed 12 Apr. 2015]. Turner, J. J., Wilson, K. (2006). Grocery loyalty: Tesco Clubcard and its impact on loyalty. British Food Journal, 108(11), 958-964 Hallberg, G. (2004). Is your loyalty programme really building loyalty? Why increasing emotional attachment, not just repeat buying, is key to maximising programme success. Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing, 12(3), 231-241. Jones, D. T. (2001). Tesco.com: delivering home shopping. ECR Journal, 1(1), 37-43. Yoruk, D. E., Radosevic, S. (2000). International Expansion and Buyer Driven Commodity Chain: The case of Tesco. SSEES/UCL: The Emerging Industrial Architecture of the Wider Europe.

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

UCLA Bus Trip Essay Example For Students

UCLA Bus Trip Essay William Zorach conceived a sculpture entitled Victory that shows an indebtedness to the late classical fourth century B. C. idealized images of Venus, combined with a figural attitude of flight that is perhaps derived from the twisting torso of the conceptions of flight in the winged Victory of Samothrace. The figure exhibits a lustrous surface of sensual light that is reminiscent of the finish on Donatellos bronze image of David. The torso may be viewed at once as a provacative and modern heroic image of the feminine grace of womanhood. Two Lines oblique Down, Variation H by George Ricky was conceived with a concern for the problems of space and time wherein there is a constant transformation of natural forces of Nature. The spatial configurations that are produced by the action of linear triangular points that pivot on the principle of lever action that was first discovered by the Greek mathematician Archimedes 287-212 B. C.. The reference to this progenitor, the symmetrical geometry, and concern for change are all modern expressions of classicism. We will write a custom essay on UCLA Bus Trip specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Francisco Zuniga conceived Desmudo Reclinado, a sculptural image of a crouching woman that at once expresses a classical monumentality and a humble dignity. The artist has produced an heroic image of the enduring peasant, reminiscent of Jean Francois Millets mid-ninteenth century conceptualizations of peasants presented with a Michael-Angelesque grandeur. Jacques Lipschitz conceived of a bathing figure by analyzing her in terms of concave and convex geometric shapes that form and abstract ordered interplay that results in the creation of a new conceptual reality. The figure is an example of classicism in the modern cubist movement. David Smith created Cubi XX, an open sculpture of geometric shapes that are precariously balanced upon each other. This image is comparable to the projection of the modern cubist paintings projected into the third dimension. When view from certain angles one can see an obvious religious influence in the form of an perfectly proportioned cross. By using the medium of stainless steel, Smith has achieved the impact of bringing the traditional opinions and philosophies of the past to focus in the present, thereby displaying the belief that truth and honesty are values that never lose their luster. I find that I am most attracted to a work of art by the amount of planning I project it took to create. I am also impressed by how accurately an artist is able to make his or her projection into reality of an idea resemble what they have in their mind. This is why I prefer strict geometrical shapes and mathematically perfect images to some of the more free form representations.

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Blindness Review Essay Example

Blindness Review Paper Essay on Blindness I do not really want to read a book, which is written on the inside, that this authors prose is imbued with humanism, warmth and humanity. The humanism can not believe. The heat left somewhere in the school physics course. Nonetheless read. To me, this book seemed very cruel. And I can not remember the last time I wrote I was so hurt. When reading, I wanted to roar, just like that, in the train, where the stuffy, full of people with tents and some drunk idiots all the time backpack hurt hair. We will write a custom essay sample on Blindness Review specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Blindness Review specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Blindness Review specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer in any city, in any country an epidemic of blindness. People suddenly become blind, it is contagious and spreads very quickly. All cases immediately placed in quarantine an empty mental hospital where blind people are left to themselves It is quite helpless, they are in a confined space, none of them do not care, they are not allowed to go out.. They can neither bathe themselves or get to the toilet, patients becoming more and eating less. All of this is watching the doctors wife, who went with her husband to quarantine, though not blind. She is forced to also pretend to be blind, look at all this stuff, and try to somehow imperceptibly help people. From this plot would be easiest to do action in the style of 28 Days Later or Night of the Living Dead but the Nobel Prize of course, not so easy to give. Rather difficult text with a clear taste of post-modernism, the almost complete absence of dialogue, but still off difficult. Read was scary, because once it has become clear that all our small and a nice little cozy the world, with all of these right values ​​and morality just fake. Quite a bit to change the terms, and it will not I have read and asked myself:. I would have been able to kill a man? And if in self-defense? And if you not only protect yourself -? I would give myself to rape for food? Or would have died of hunger -? Could do so to live because to live like And its just seems to be a no-no-no ?. perhaps this is a book about how little it is necessary to cease to be a person. and probably that we are almost always blind, even though we see.

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Free Essays on Queen Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace near London. Her father was England’s King Henry VIII; her mother was the king’s second wife, Anne Boleyn. Elizabeth had an older half-sister, Mary, who was the daughter of the King’s first wife, Catherine of Aragon. As Henry VIII’s second eldest child, pushed back to third in line for the throne by the complex politics of the period, Elizabeth was a master of political science. According to â€Å"Elizabeth I (1558-1603AD)† from Britannia Online, she had a very practical education in political intrigue – and the fine art of political survival. She came in 1558 to the royal throne and inherited her father’s supremacist view of the monarchy, but showed great wisdom by refusing to directly provoke Parliament. Elizabeth acquired undying devotion from her advisement council, who were constantly puzzled by her habit of waiting till the last minute to make decisions. She proceeded to give England 45 years of strong government, moderate religious policies, and unexplained prosperity (â€Å"Elizabeth I (1558-1603)†). Elizabeth was glorified by poets and artists as Gloriana, the Virgin Queen. With the help of fine c lothes, jewels and cosmetics, the vain queen maintained a glamorous image despite her advancing age. There are surprisingly not many descriptions of Queen Elizabeth I. There was however, in 1557, a description given by Giovanni Michiel in his report to the Venetian Doge and the Senate on Queen Elizabeth’s features when she was Princess at the age of twenty-three. He stated that, â€Å"her face is comely rather than handsome, but she is tall and well formed, with good skin, although swarthy; she has fine eyes† (Strong, pg.19). It was not until 1596, forty years later, when an Italian visitor, Francesco Gardening, described her as â€Å"short, and ruddy in complexion; very strong built† (Strong, pg. 19). An agent of Henry IV’s, refe... Free Essays on Queen Elizabeth I Free Essays on Queen Elizabeth I Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace near London. Her father was England’s King Henry VIII; her mother was the king’s second wife, Anne Boleyn. Elizabeth had an older half-sister, Mary, who was the daughter of the King’s first wife, Catherine of Aragon. As Henry VIII’s second eldest child, pushed back to third in line for the throne by the complex politics of the period, Elizabeth was a master of political science. According to â€Å"Elizabeth I (1558-1603AD)† from Britannia Online, she had a very practical education in political intrigue – and the fine art of political survival. She came in 1558 to the royal throne and inherited her father’s supremacist view of the monarchy, but showed great wisdom by refusing to directly provoke Parliament. Elizabeth acquired undying devotion from her advisement council, who were constantly puzzled by her habit of waiting till the last minute to make decisions. She proceeded to give England 45 years of strong government, moderate religious policies, and unexplained prosperity (â€Å"Elizabeth I (1558-1603)†). Elizabeth was glorified by poets and artists as Gloriana, the Virgin Queen. With the help of fine c lothes, jewels and cosmetics, the vain queen maintained a glamorous image despite her advancing age. There are surprisingly not many descriptions of Queen Elizabeth I. There was however, in 1557, a description given by Giovanni Michiel in his report to the Venetian Doge and the Senate on Queen Elizabeth’s features when she was Princess at the age of twenty-three. He stated that, â€Å"her face is comely rather than handsome, but she is tall and well formed, with good skin, although swarthy; she has fine eyes† (Strong, pg.19). It was not until 1596, forty years later, when an Italian visitor, Francesco Gardening, described her as â€Å"short, and ruddy in complexion; very strong built† (Strong, pg. 19). An agent of Henry IV’s, refe...

Thursday, November 21, 2019

HOW TO DEVELOP THE ESTREN FOOD IN THE UK Assignment

HOW TO DEVELOP THE ESTREN FOOD IN THE UK - Assignment Example 2012). Also the skills related to its job position should be set, so that hiring for these positions to be developed with no delay (Gilmore and Williams 2012). The HRM issues of the restaurant are analyzed further in section 2 of this paper. Another organizational sector that should be carefully reviewed in advance is accounting. Chapman et al. (2011) notes that in all firms accounting can result to important challenges mostly because of the following facts: a) it is difficult for managers to choose in advance the accounting strategy on which the business operations will be based; for example, emphasis will be give on re-investing profits or using profits for covering operational costs, so that the borrowing is fully avoided (Chapman et al. 2011, p.709), b) the level of profitability of a business and the market performance cannot be predicted in advance, a fact that it is quite common in new businesses; in this context, Eastern foods should not adopt a strict accounting strategy but rather short-term accounting plans should be applied, so that alterations and replacements are feasible in case of market changes or low profits. At the same time, Al-Hakim (2007) explains that managers in new businesses should emphasize on the introduction of effective knowledge management systems. These systems can secure high speed and accuracy in regard to the knowledge transferred; under these terms the success of a firm’s accounting system is guaranteed (Al-Hakim 2007). In addition, managers in Eastern Foods have to face a series of operational issues, such as: a) would the operational framework of the business be the same as in the mother company, in India? B) Should innovative practices be introduced in order for the restaurant’s operations to be more aligned to the Western culture (Barnes 2008)? c) Which will be the exact form of the firm’s

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Computed Tomography (CT scan) Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words

Computed Tomography (CT scan) - Research Paper Example The last two decades have seen popularity in terms of the increase of usage and new technological implications that can enhance this machine to produce even more detailed imaging solutions in the future. That being said, the potential side effects of this imaging that have been known to cause cancer or kidney problems in most cases, make a strong case against the development and use of such a technology. This paper will elaborate on the technology and its usage with a study on the potential side effects of this kind of imaging. It will also shed light on is wide spread application in today’s medical world and means through which the harmful implications from the use of radiation technology of CT scanning can be minimized. The word tomography is derived from the Greek language where ‘tomo’ means ‘slice’ and ‘graphien’ means ‘write’ (Medical News Today, 2013). The technology basically involves the creation of 3-D imaging with the help of many 2-D images taken of the body, referring to the ‘slicing’ of images. First introduced in the 1970s, the technology has come a long way as far as the mechanism and clinical usage patterns of this technology are concerned. Starting off with the technology itself, computing tomography or Ct scanning conventionally makes use of an x-ray tube and sensory detectors that rotate behind the circular surface of the scanning head. Several functional options enable doctors to focus on a specialized scan that may be used to evaluate a specific body part for example blood vessels, nerves or bones. As the rotation takes place several mages are captured and collected as sonograms. These multiple sonograms are then made into information that can be interpreted. Sonograms combine through tomographic reconstruction to produce a series of cross sectional images. There are various types of mathematical and geometric techniques that can be used for this conversion, like linear algebra, filtered back

Sunday, November 17, 2019

Henderson The Rain King Essay Example for Free

Henderson The Rain King Essay The great book ‘Henderson the Rain King’ is a masterpiece creation of an imperative American writer who in addition became the source of inspiration for many other writers in the era of 1950s. The author, Saul Bellow’s triumph has been striking enough for he stirred other writers a new-fangled kind of idol and a new type of expressive fashion (High, 12). Bellow’s lead character lives dynamically within his own intellect. In scripting his hero, Saul Bellow has a few characteristic qualities assembled in his works. In this book he crafts a character who at all times seeks various exposures. In this paper I will discuss how Henderson has some pre-arranged stereotypes about Africa and the people there, what he learns from them in the end, how does Henderson `find` him self in Africa and will support all this with examples from the book. This book begins with a radiant portrayal, the thought of a determined victim, the personality of Henderson, and his declaration of having resolved a trouble. Henderson is actually an American hero probing toward maturity, hesitant between a desire to be loved and abandonment from a world which does not care for him as he needs; he is unripe and a victim of his own thoughts and desires. Bellow has sketched a hero who seems to be disgruntled with the truth of his existence. He is suffocating beneath the accumulative specifics of his life even though he appears to contain what people valor wish for; that is assets and position, wealth and love, as he is described by the people of his times. Many feel that the author has actually carved out a character that is none else but the author himself. Many believe that Saul had a mindset or more specifically stereotypes about Africa and its natives that he inks out through this book. In the book through satire and spoof, Bellow provides ridiculous loads of its banalities. Henderson is a mockery of the bizarre, aggressive, artist-hero of the Stephan Daedalus range. Fiddler and pig grower, he is described as a menopausal social outcast and that is what Bellow had the stereotype about the Africans (High, 33). A straight caricature of the Hemingway narcissist, he is solemn, thoughtful, solipsistic, clumsy, and self-centered. He supposes with his Eliotic fisher king forbears that the land is cursed. As Bellow had stereotyped the Africans, the hero in his book, is in reality Bellows reply to an age group of recent writers who retorted with overstated discontent to the botched assurances of Rousseauistic idealism (Ophdal, 62). It is in addition a notable investigation into the incompatible codes of maleness that bothers the contemporary American gentleman. Henderson merges the idealistic maverick, rich capitalist, rough warrior, schlemiel, unattractive American, and spiritual quester in his character of Henderson which speaks volumes about Bellow’s stereotype of the native Africans. Considerably, we find that once when he has been embraced by African classic mother-goddesses, and has taken training from a lioness, he is competent to suppress his previous aggressiveness to his housekeeper whom he has screamed to demise, his daughter whom he has overlooked, and Lily whom he has disgraced and mistreated for years (Bellow, 59). He is after everything else seen taking pride in his lately attained spiritual balance, taking on an orphan kid on the glacial ice cap of Newfoundland. As a final point, the I desire influence in his heart is at rest. Nevertheless, we are left to ponder whether he can uphold this stability found in the simple loneliness of a glacial ice cap inside the collective circumstances of his family unit. It illustrates the distinct survival wit of the Eastern European shtetl and its stereotypes. Bellow in this book claims that literary innovation has formed novels bursting of the communal disorders of our daytime and urbanized a common sense of catastrophe. Bellow, particularly in ‘Henderson The Rain King’ cultivated for American literature a few of the humorist postures, stereotypes, and mythology of Yiddish literature. His principal work of domestication of Yiddish fable is the utilization of comedy to mutually steal from self-pity and augment the actual existential problem of the hero through the wit shambling pursuit depicted in Henderson’s role (Ophdal, 77). Bowel embarks on a journey to defy racially prejudiced legends and uphold racial synchronization. Henderson commences his pursuit sharing in white prejudices against Africans. Though Bellow believed that they were just prejudices, they were deep-rooted in his opinion and tend to propose lucid ineptitude on the part of Africans (Bellow, 87). They contributed in the primitivist national troops of Africa that was suggested by Conrads Heart of Darkness. Ultimately, nevertheless, Henderson is exposed to his love of Western Civilization and takes a massive fabled jump in time. It is a three-part hunt relating sin, penance, and escape. If we analyze how Henderson evolved throughout the narration, we find that there were till the end some traces of the deep- rooted stereotypes present in his personality but as in the novel when it finally started to rain, it actually depicts that Henderson had freed himself from his thoughts and burdens of the images that he always had. It may well be that he in reality resembles other wastrels who have attempted to flee from themselves on voyages to remote places, but, for all his bristle and self-worth, all his sympathy and humbleness, all his obscure references to fine art, writing and times gone by, Henderson remains only a weary cursed with for the most part uneasy stream of fancy chatter in a store of current fiction. He is finally seen to have found peace within himself. The continuous â€Å"want† â€Å"want† screams within him that lead him to the painful journey, were in the end crushed as he contends with the surroundings and learns to accept things that he cannot change. Many readers though still question, whether a character like Henderson can stay content with the peace he found for long. The conclusion of the movements is the track in the stillness of love and decision, the agitated man, the battered animal, and the stray children who have all accomplished shared comfort and salvation.Prayers for rainfall are responded to, the impatient traveler turns in the direction of abode, and the long nights voyage finally reaches day. Works Cited Bellow, Saul (1976) Henderson the Rain King. New York: Viking Press Publishers. High, Peter (1986) An Outline of American Literature. New York: Longman Inc. Ophdal, Keith Michael (1978) The Novel of Saul Bellow: An Introduction. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania University Press. Majdiak, Daniel. (1991). â€Å"The Romantic Self and Henderson the Rain King† in Bucknell Review: A Scholarly Journal of Letters, Arts and Sciences.